HBR – Professor Recommends Books

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Disclaimer : Three out of seven books, I have read and thus tempted to share the list with you…in some time, I plan to read all of them…

Mostly, we do not finish books, but I have come to realise that buy as many books as one can, and try and read them as many as possible…some time, best insights, motivation, thoughts, refreshing ideas come from these reading.

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Max Bazerman, a business psychology professor at Harvard Business School and the author of the best book on general decision making that I’ve ever read, “Judgment in Managerial Decision Making,” came out with 7 book recommendations.

I hadn’t heard of two of these, which I picked up.

1. “Thinking, Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman

I think we’ve all heard of this one. Bazerman says:

The development of decision research is the most pronounced influence of the social sciences on professional education and societal change that we have witness in the last half century. Kahneman is the greatest social scientist of our time, and” Thinking, Fast and Slow” provides an integrated history of the fields of behavioral decision research and behavioral economics, the role of our two different systems for processing information (System 1 vs. System 2), and the wonderful story of Kahneman’s relationship with Amos Tversky (Tversky would have shared Kahneman’s Nobel Prize had he not passed away at an early age).

2. “Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness” by Richard Thaler & Cass Sunstein

This is another one I think most of you have heard of but it’s a classic. I once used this book as the foundation to make the case to a management team for hiring a group of behavioral psychologists. Along with “Thinking, Fast and Slow” it is part of the ultimate behavioral economics reading list.

Nudge takes the study of how humans depart from rational decision making and turns this work into a prescriptive strategy for action. Over the last 40 years, we have learned a great deal about the systematic and predictable ways in which the human mind departs from rational action. Yet, we have observed dozens of studies that show the limits of trying to de-bias the human mind. Nudge highlights that we do not need to de-bias humans, we simply need to understand humans, and create decision architectures with a realistic understanding of the human to guide humans to wise decisions. Nudge has emerged as the bible of behavioral insight teams that are transforming the ways countries help to devise wise policies.

3. “The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine” by Michael Lewis

Lewis is an amazing writer, with the talent to capture amazing features of how humans have the capacity to overcome common limitations. Moneyball (that would have been on the list, but I imposed a one book per author limit) was a fascinating look about how overcoming common human limits allowed baseball leaders to develop unique and effective leadership strategies. In The Big Short, Lewis shows how people can notice, even when most of us are failing to do so. Lewis shows that it was possible to notice vast problems with our economy by 2007, and tells the amazing account of those who did.

4. “Eyewitness To Power: The Essence of Leadership Nixon to Clinton” by David Gergen

This one looks fascinating.

David Gergen is an amazingly insightful intellect about so many things, including the nature of Presidential leadership. His writing is wonderful, and his ability to pull out the nuggets of effective leadership in his closing chapter is a lasting contribution. You will learn about four Presidents that have escaped you in the past, and in the process, learn some insights about leadership in your organization.

5. “Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them” by Joshua Greene

This book has been recommended to me by so many smart people that there must be something to it.

Joshua Greene is a wonderful mix of insightful philosopher, careful psychologist, and keen observer of human morality. If you have ever been confronted with the famous “trolley problem”, and want to learn more, Moral Tribes is the place to go. Whether you are a philosopher looking for a new path, a psychologist looking for insight from a new direction, or simply a human who wants to understand your own morality, this book is terrific.

6. “Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending” by Elizabeth Dunn & Michael Norton

For decades, the study of consumer behavior has been dominated by the question of how marketers can understand consumers to sell their products and services. Dunn and Norton use contemporary social science to provide insight into what consumers can do to make themselves, rather than marketers, happy.

7. “The Art and Science of Negotiation” by Howard Raiffa

The Art and Science of Negotiation is where it all began from an intellectual standpoint, where Raiffa provides insight into how to think systematically in a world where you cannot count on the other side to do so.

 

Free Ebook On Social Life of Networked Teen

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Books, Interesting Idea

itscomplicated

Any on interested in reading about the social life of kids/teens on internet, its a very good read. A free downloadable (legit) copy of danah boyd book. It’s Complicated.

The book covers following topics…

1 identity why do teens seem strange online?
2 privacy why do youth share so publicly?
3 addiction what makes teens obsessed with social media?
4 danger are sexual predators lurking everywhere?
5 bullying is social media amplifying meanness and cruelty?
6 inequality can social media resolve social divisions?
7 literacy are today’s youth digital natives?
8 searching for a public of their own

 

You may read more about book here..

You may download the book here..

 

Dlibert

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Books, Thinking

210163.strip

The Passion is Bullshit.

The goals are for looser.

If you happen to follow the Dilbert Cartoon and loves the blog post of Mr. Scott Adams, you know about his book. How to fail at all most everything and still make it big….The books is very interesting read…Presently its not available in India, you may have to order thru Amazon.in or Flipkart.

Very intelligently book; written in humours way. The concepts and Ideas are very thought provoking.

You may enjoy the Teaser about his book on Slide Share.

Or

Follow him on dilbert.

 

 

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Books
books-in-the-library-on-the-code-and-theory-office-tour

You are a well read bunch so I was looking forward to compiling the second annual look at your favorite reads featured on Farnam Street in 2013.

While I never had any doubt that Farnam Streeters are the smartest people on the internet, the data once again tells that story too.

1. Seeking Wisdom: From Darwin to Munger

Peter Bevelin begins his fascinating book with Confucius’ great wisdom: “A man who has committed a mistake and doesn’t correct it, is committing another mistake.” From Amazon:

This book is for those who love the constant search for knowledge. It is in the spirit of Charles Munger, who says, “All I want to know is where I’m going to die so I’ll never go there.” There are roads that lead to unhappiness. An understanding of how and why we can “die” should help us avoid them. We can’t eliminate mistakes, but we can prevent those that can really hurt us. Using exemplars of clear thinking and attained wisdom, Bevelin focuses on how our thoughts are influenced, why we make misjudgments and tools to improve our thinking. Bevelin tackles such eternal questions as: Why do we behave like we do? What do we want out of life? What interferes with our goals? Read and study this wonderful multidisciplinary exploration of wisdom. It may change the way you think and act in business and in life.

2. It’s Not All About Me

I’m not quite sure how I came across Robin Dreeke’s It’s Not All About Me but I’m glad I did.

Dreeke is the lead instructor at the FBI’s Counterintelligence Training Center in all behavioral and interpersonal skills training. And he wrote an awesome book on how to master the skills of communication.

This is a modern version of the timeless How to Win Friends and Influence People.

3. How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading

From Amazon:

How to Read a Book, originally published in 1940, has become a rare phenomenon, a living classic. It is the best and most successful guide to reading comprehension for the general reader. And now it has been completely rewritten and updated.

You are told about the various levels of reading and how to achieve them — from elementary reading, through systematic skimming and inspectional reading, to speed reading, you learn how to pigeonhole a book, X-ray it, extract the author’s message, criticize. You are taught the different reading techniques for reading practical books, imaginative literature, plays, poetry, history, science and mathematics, philosophy and social science.

Finally, the authors offer a recommended reading list and supply reading tests whereby you can measure your own progress in reading skills, comprehension and speed.

4. Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind

From Amazon:

Are you over-extended, over-distracted, and overwhelmed? Do you work at a breakneck pace all day, only to find that you haven’t accomplished the most important things on your agenda when you leave the office?

The world has changed and the way we work has to change, too. With wisdom from 20 leading creative minds, Manage Your Day-to-Day will give you a toolkit for tackling the new challenges of a 24/7, always-on workplace.

5. The Moral Sayings Of Publius Syrus: A Roman Slave

A Syrian slave, Syrus is full of timeless wisdom. Want an example? “From the errors of others, a wise man corrects his own.” Here is another “It is not every question that deserves an answer.” Ok, one more? “To do two things at once is to do neither.” And he didn’t even know of Facebook and Twitter. You can read this book in under an hour but spend the rest of your life trying to learn and apply his wisdom.

6. Letters from a Stoic

I came to Seneca a few years ago. It’s clear from reading Seneca that he’s full of wisdom. His letters deal with everything we deal with today: success, failure, wealth, poverty, grief. His philosophy is practical. Not only will reading this book help equip you for what comes in life but it’ll help you communicate with others.

From Amazon:

A philosophy that saw self-possession as the key to an existence lived ‘in accordance with nature’, Stoicism called for the restraint of animal instincts and the severing of emotional ties. These beliefs were formulated by the Athenian followers of Zeno in the fourth century BC, but it was in Seneca (c. 4 BC – AD 65) that the Stoics found their most eloquent advocate. Stoicism, as expressed in the Letters, helped ease pagan Rome’s transition to Christianity, for it upholds upright ethical ideals and extols virtuous living, as well as expressing disgust for the harsh treatment of slaves and the inhumane slaughters witnessed in the Roman arenas. Seneca’s major contribution to a seemingly unsympathetic creed was to transform it into a powerfully moving and inspiring declaration of the dignity of the individual mind.

7. Meditations

From Amazon:

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (a.d. 121–180) succeeded his adoptive father as emperor of Rome in a.d. 161—and Meditations remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. With a profound understanding of human behavior, Marcus provides insights, wisdom, and practical guidance on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity to interacting with others. Consequently, the Meditations have become required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of ordinary readers have responded to the straightforward intimacy of his style. In Gregory Hays’s new translation—the first in a generation—Marcus’s thoughts speak with a new immediacy: never before have they been so directly and powerfully presented.

8. The Art of Worldly Wisdom

The Art of Worldly Wisdom: A Pocket Oracle is a book of three hundred aphorisms for making one’s way in the world and achieving distinction.

It provides advice not only for modern “image makers” and “spin doctors,” but also for the candid: for those who insist that substance, not image, is what really matters. “Do, but also seem,” is Gracián’s pithy advice

 

The book was imitated by La Rochefoucauld, cherished by Friedrich Nietzsche, and translated into German by Arthur Schopenhauer. Nietzsche observed that “Europe has never produced anything finer or more complicated in matters of moral subtlety.”

9. A Technique for Producing Ideas

From Amazon:

This short but powerful book has helped thousands of writers, artists, scientists, and engineers to solve problems and generate ideas. Now let James Webb Young’s unique insights help you be more creative in every area of life. Advertising mogul William Bernbach wrote, “James Webb Young is in the tradition of some of our greatest thinkers when he describes the workings of the creative process. The results of many years in advertising have proved to him that the key element in communications success is the production of relevant and dramatic ideas. He not only makes this point vividly for us but shows us the road to that goal.”

10. Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger

Pound for pound one of the most important books I’ve ever read. To those of you who claim this book is too expensive I say ignorance is even costlier.

Source : Strategy : By Farnam Street